#100: It’s All Too Much

For a couple of months in 1967 and 1968, the Beatles had a running joke/strategy that they were dumping lesser tracks in order to fulfill contractual requirements for the movieĀ Yellow Submarine. But aside from “Only a Northern Song” (incidentally, the lowest-ranking solo George Harrison composition on the countdown), they actually gave the filmmakers some unique and high-quality tracks, from the kid-friendly “All Together Now” to the unsettling rocker “Hey Bulldog” to the feedback-laden proto-grunge of “It’s All Too Much.”

We enter the top 100 with the second George Harrison track in a row, and this lengthy, psychedelic anthem is unlike anything else in the Beatles’ catalog. With loud, shredding guitars, a surprisingly gentle vocal, a possibly superfluous brass section (I go back and forth), and a chaotic organ part, there is a lot to unpack here. The elephant in the room is that Continue reading “#100: It’s All Too Much”

#100: It’s All Too Much

#198: Only a Northern Song

As much as I’ve grown to appreciate Paul McCartney’s solo and Wings work over the last few years, George Harrison will probably always be my favorite Beatle. He really started to emerge as a songwriter in the group’s later years, and his 1970 triple LP All Things Must Pass is the finest solo album by any of the Fab Four. That said, not all of his 22 Beatles compositions can be winners, and the worst is “Only a Northern Song,” a tedious excursion that takes every psychedelic cliche you can think of, tosses them into a blender, and purees them into a headache-inducing mess.

chloraseptic.jpg

Much like my famous rum and coke and Chloraseptic cocktail.

 

George sounds almost as bored singing this song as the listener inevitably will be hearing it. Recorded nearly two years earlier as a Sgt. Pepper outtake, it finally popped up Continue reading “#198: Only a Northern Song”

#198: Only a Northern Song